People love using VPNs for a variety of reasons but if you’re the administrator of any network they can be a real problem. Of course, the primary function of a VPN is security and if users simply used the VPN to encrypt and secure their data then that would be fine. However in reality what you’ll really find is users connecting through a VPN in order to bypass blocks or access sites normally restricted by your network rules. Using a VPN service watch UK TV is a common issue in our US/European network.

The problem is that these sites and activities are blocked for a reason. Having twenty people streaming the latest episode of ‘Strictly’ over the companies network uses the same bandwidth as about a 100 ordinary users simply working. It doesn’t matter that the traffic is being carried over the VPN it still uses our own bandwidth to deliver to the client. So it’s hardly surprising that we need to restrict the use of these VPN clients and the issues they cause. Here’s an example of what people can use these VPN services to do and the problems we can have in blocking them –

As you can see in this particular VPN service called Identity Cloaker there are lots of configuration options which can be used to hide the use of the service. Most of the recommended measures rely on blocking the standard footprints of a VPN service, but as you can see when you are able to switch outgoing ports and create a non-standard configuration it becomes much harder.

There is little in the data you can pick up on so those content filters are pretty much useless. The problem here is that most VPNs are encrypted so that even the destination address is encrypted (although obviously not the IP address). It’s simple to block the web based proxies and VPN services simply by restricting access to their URLs but these clients are much more difficult.

As you can see most services usually have the option to switch between hundreds of different IP addresses even doing so automatically. This is another way you can identify a simple proxy or VPN looking for consistent traffic patterns and single IP addresses. Filtering access to a VPN service which automatically switches server and IP address every few minutes is extremely difficult. Unless they do something with a distinct pattern and very heavy usage like anonymous torrenting then any footprint is almost impossible to detect.

Most administrators usually adopt an attitude of blocking the simplest VPN access and leaving it at that. The reality is that a technical user who is using a sophisticated VPN service like Identity Cloaker is going to be very difficult to stop. You should rely on enforcing User policies within the network and stressing the penalties if people are found using such services.

One other method to consider is ensuring that most users are not able to install or configure the VPN clients on their local laptops or computers. These can normally enforced very easily particularly in Windows environments. Simply configure local user policy and apply restrictive Group Policy settings to remove admin access to users. Unfortunately programs like Identity Cloaker also come with a ‘lite’ version which don’t need installing and can be run directly from a single executable. It can even be run from a memory stick and still interact with the network stack on the local computer.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *